General

EXPLOIT ɛksplɔɪt

14 Jul 2020

Verb

  • use to your benefit.
Example Sentence: The country's resources are not being fully exploited.
 

SUM SOMETHING UP  

09 Jul 2020

Phrasal Verb

  • to summarise something; to outline the main points.
Example Sentence: Can we sum up what was said in the meeting.
 

OFFHAND ɔfˈhænd

07 Jul 2020

Adverb

  • without preparation and without thinking about something.
Example Sentence: He couldn't tell me offhand whether the item in question is tradeable or not. He promised to check the details and then get back to me.
 

ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING  

06 Jul 2020

Noun

  • one of the most important meetings of the shareholders of a company or the members of an organization, where they discuss results of the past year, make decisions about future plans, discuss budget etc.
Example Sentence: I hope they will accept my report at the AGM next week – I've been working on it for quite a while and it may have an effect on my promotion prospects.
 

TO SOW THE SEEDS  

05 Jul 2020

Phrase

  • to start a process etc that is going to have a certain result.
Example Sentence: Capital inflows could sow the seeds of a new renaissance.
 

TO STICK TO THE POINT  

03 Jul 2020

Phrase

  • to continue with a topic without changing it or digressing from it.
Example Sentence: Could you please stick to the point? We've been listening to you for long minutes now and you still haven't explained your real reasons.
 

TO REVIVE rɪˈvaɪv

01 Jul 2020

Verb

  • to make something strong and healthy again after a difficult period.
Example Sentence: Policy makers have been struggling to revive the economy and experts say the right measures have been introduced to this end.
 

TO LUBRICATE lubrɪˌkeɪt

30 Jun 2020

Verb

  • to make something run/operate more smoothly.
Example Sentence: The government intended to lubricate the financial wheels with the help of a series of measures.
 

TO LOSE OUT TO  

29 Jun 2020

Phrasal Verb

  • to not get a deal/business because a competitor has offered better conditions/lower prices etc and thus got it
Example Sentence: Artists of the music and film industry are losing out to piracy so it's a question of life and death to work out ways in which to get back at least some of the revenues.
 

TO REAP rip

25 Jun 2020

Verb

  • to get something as a result of an activity.
Example Sentence: The German car maker expects to reap 56% of its profits in Asia next year.
 

TO PIGEONHOLE pɪdʒənˌhoʊl

22 Jun 2020

Verb

  • to categorise somebody, to label somebody.
Example Sentence: Almost everybody gets pigeonholed for one reason or another. My boss, for example, thinks I am the one who is always late, although I only miss my train to work every second week.
 

TO BE ON THE BALL  

21 Jun 2020

Phrase

  • to be able to understand and react to any situation or fact quickly.
Example Sentence: Although the new marketing manager is really on the ball, the CEO doesn't like her. He must be jealous – she is much younger and probably much more talented than he is.
 

GROUND-BREAKING graʊndˌbreɪkɪŋ

16 Jun 2020

Adjective

  • pioneering.
Example Sentence: His ground-breaking study on the role of fringe benefits in motivating workforce came out in 1981.
 

TO FLOP flɒp

15 Jun 2020

Verb

  • to fail completely.
Example Sentence: Their new line of dishwashers flopped in Asia because they did not take into account size differences.
 

CEILING silɪŋ

13 Jun 2020

Noun

  • the highest amount or limit that can be charged for a product or service; also, the maximum number or quantity of goods that can be produced.
Example Sentence: The government decided to intervene and place a price ceiling on certain products - the impact on consumer demand and production was dramatic.
 
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