General

LATER leɪtər

21 Nov 2019

adjective

  • Later is the comparative form of the adjective late, meaning (happening or being) near the end of a period of time.
Example Sentences: Jenny said she'd be joining the meeting later.
He arrived a little later than expected.
 

LATTER lætər

20 Nov 2019

adjective

  • Latter is an adjective meaning near or towards the end of something.
Example Sentences: Building of the new library should begin in the latter part of next year.
In the latter stages of the fight he began to get tired.
 

FORMALLY fɔrməli

17 Nov 2019

adverb

  • Formally is an adverb based on the adjective formal, which describes language, clothes and behaviour that are serious and correct.
Example Sentences: He was formally dressed in a grey suit.
The head teacher greeted us very formally.
 

FORMERLY fɔrmərli

16 Nov 2019

adverb

  • Formerly is an adverb meaning in the past.
Example Sentences: The European Union was formerly called the European Community.
Hong Kong was formerly a British colony.
 

PRINCIPLE prɪnsəpəl

14 Nov 2019

noun

  • A principle is a basic idea or rule that explains or controls how something happens or works.
Example Sentences: The principle of democracy is important to Americans.
I agree with you in principle but I think it will be difficult to achieve in practice.
 

DRAUGHT drɑft

13 Nov 2019

noun

  • A draught is a current of unpleasantly cold air blowing through a room. (confusingly in US English they use 'draft' to mean this).
Example Sentences: Can you shut the door? - there's a terrible draught coming through.
 

EXCEPT ɪkˈsɛpt

11 Nov 2019

preposition

  • Except is a preposition meaning not including or but not.
Example Sentences: The museum is open daily except Monday(s).
The government has few options except to keep interest rates high.
 

COARSE kɔrs

08 Nov 2019

adjective

  • If something is coarse, it is rude and offensive. Coarse can also be used to mean rough and not soft.
Example Sentences: My boss is always telling coarse jokes.
The sand is very coarse on this beach.
 

TO CALL IT QUITS  

29 Oct 2019

phrase

  • To call it quits is to stop doing something, or to agree with someone that a debt has been paid and that no one owes anything more.
Example Sentences: I reckon we owe you about the same as you owe us. Why don't we just call it quits?
I paid for last week's shopping and you paid for this week's, so let's call it quits.
 

TO CALL IT A DAY  

28 Oct 2019

phrase

  • To call it a day is to stop the work you are doing.
Example Sentences: We've been working on this for fourteen hours now. Isn't it time we called it a day?
I'm getting a bit tired now - shall we call it a day?
 

A MONEY-SPINNER  

27 Oct 2019

phrase

  • A money-spinner is a product or activity which produces a lot of money.
Example Sentences: The magazine was a money-spinner for a few years until the Internet became popular.
The iPod has been a real money-spinner for Apple.
 

TO GIVE SOMEONE A GOLDEN HANDSHAKE  

26 Oct 2019

phrase

  • If someone is given a golden handshake, usually a large payment is made to them when they leave their job, either when their employer has asked them to leave or when they are leaving at the end of their working life, as a reward for very long or good service in their job.
Example Sentences: Tim was forced to leave his job but he was given a very generous golden handshake.
He was given a golden handshake of US$1 million when he retired after working with the company for 40 years.
 

TO COOK THE BOOKS  

25 Oct 2019

phrase

  • To cook the books is to change numbers dishonestly in the accounts of an organization, especially in order to steal money from it or to avoid paying corporation tax.
Example Sentences: Their accounts were completely fake. They had been cooking the books for years.
His company never pays any tax. I wonder if they're cooking the books.
 

TO DO A ROARING TRADE  

24 Oct 2019

phrase

  • To do a roaring trade is to sell a lot of goods very quickly.
Example Sentences: The product has been a great success. We're doing a roaring trade in it.
It was a hot sunny day and the ice-cream sellers were doing a roaring trade.
 

TO BE ON THE MAKE  

23 Oct 2019

phrase

  • If someone is on the make they are trying very hard to obtain more money and power.
Example Sentences: I wouldn't trust Harry. He's definitely someone who is on the make.
Tom's a young man on the make - he doesn't care who he offends.
 
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