Business Word/Phrase of the Day

word-phrase-descEvery day we publish a business word or phrase together with audio pronunciation, phonetics, definition and example sentences. To receive 'Business Word/Phrase of the Day' by email, just subscribe to our newsletter. You can choose whether to receive notifications daily, weekly or monthly. Simply click on the link on the right to subscribe. It's free!

TO CALL IT QUITS  

23 Sep 2017

phrase

  • To call it quits is to stop doing something, or to agree with someone that a debt has been paid and that no one owes anything more.
Example Sentences: I reckon we owe you about the same as you owe us. Why don't we just call it quits?
I paid for last week's shopping and you paid for this week's, so let's call it quits.
 

TO CALL IT A DAY  

22 Sep 2017

phrase

  • To call it a day is to stop the work you are doing.
Example Sentences: We've been working on this for fourteen hours now. Isn't it time we called it a day?
I'm getting a bit tired now - shall we call it a day?
 

A MONEY-SPINNER  

21 Sep 2017

phrase

  • A money-spinner is a product or activity which produces a lot of money.
Example Sentences: The magazine was a money-spinner for a few years until the Internet became popular.
The iPod has been a real money-spinner for Apple.
 

TO GIVE SOMEONE A GOLDEN HANDSHAKE  

20 Sep 2017

phrase

  • If someone is given a golden handshake, usually a large payment is made to them when they leave their job, either when their employer has asked them to leave or when they are leaving at the end of their working life, as a reward for very long or good service in their job.
Example Sentences: Tim was forced to leave his job but he was given a very generous golden handshake.
He was given a golden handshake of US$1 million when he retired after working with the company for 40 years.
 

TO COOK THE BOOKS  

19 Sep 2017

phrase

  • To cook the books is to change numbers dishonestly in the accounts of an organization, especially in order to steal money from it or to avoid paying corporation tax.
Example Sentences: Their accounts were completely fake. They had been cooking the books for years.
His company never pays any tax. I wonder if they're cooking the books.
 

TO DO A ROARING TRADE  

18 Sep 2017

phrase

  • To do a roaring trade is to sell a lot of goods very quickly.
Example Sentences: The product has been a great success. We're doing a roaring trade in it.
It was a hot sunny day and the ice-cream sellers were doing a roaring trade.
 

TO BE ON THE MAKE  

17 Sep 2017

phrase

  • If someone is on the make they are trying very hard to obtain more money and power.
Example Sentences: I wouldn't trust Harry. He's definitely someone who is on the make.
Tom's a young man on the make - he doesn't care who he offends.
 

TO CUT A DEAL  

16 Sep 2017

phrase

  • To cut a deal is to make a successful, usually business, arrangement with someone or another company.
Example Sentences: We're both competing for the same business. Perhaps we can cut a deal to share out the work.
We've cut a deal with the sales staff. They've agreed to reduce their basic salary in return for more commission.
 

TO CORNER THE MARKET  

15 Sep 2017

phrase

  • If a company corners the market for a particular type of product, it is more successful than any other company at selling the product.
Example Sentences: He's the only person who imports this product. He's really cornered the market.
MacDonald's have cornered the fast-food market - they're in every big city in the world.
 

TO DRIVE A HARD BARGAIN  

14 Sep 2017

phrase

  • To drive a hard bargain is to expect a lot in exchange for what you pay or do.
Example Sentences: It's hard doing business with Maggie. She drives a hard bargain.
I had to give them a 30% discount or the deal was off. They drove a hard bargain.
 

TO STAY AHEAD OF THE PACK  

13 Sep 2017

phrase

  • To stay ahead of the pack is to maintain a business advantage over your competitors.
Example Sentences: If you want to succeed in this business you needto stay ahead of the pack.
The only way we can stay ahead of the pack is by making our products the best.
 

TO HANG UP ONE'S BOOTS  

12 Sep 2017

phrase

  • To hang up your boots is to retire from your job or profession.
Example Sentences: After 40 years in the police force, Paul finally hung up his boots.
After winning the World Rugby Cup, Martin Johnson, England's captain, hung up his boots.
 

TO HAVE ONE'S HAND or FINGERS IN THE TILL  

11 Sep 2017

phrase

  • If you have your fingers or hand in the till, you steal money from the place where you work.
Example Sentences: The accountant had stolen a lot of money. He'd had his hand in the till for years.
He was caught with his hand in the till and was fired immediately.
 

TO MAKE A KILLING  

10 Sep 2017

phrase

  • If you make a killing, you earn a lot of money in a short time and with little effort.
Example Sentences: I bought the shares cheap and sold them for a lot. I really made a killing.
They made a killing with the sale of their London house.
 

TO RUN A TIGHT SHIP  

09 Sep 2017

phrase

  • If someone runs a tight ship, they do their job or manage their department or organization in a very efficient manner.
Example Sentences: She's an excellent manager. She runs a really tight ship.
This department used to be run as a tight ship, but look at it now!
 
Menu