You can use numbers or bullet points in your vertical lists. Vertical lists are a great way of presenting more complex information clearly. Here we're just going to show you three types of bulleted lists. The differences between the three types lie in the way the lists are punctuated.

Type 1

The following conditions are necessary for fully-funded training:

  • This is your first training course.
  • Your employer signs the enclosed form.
  • You have a clean driving licence.

The initial phrase is a complete sentence but ends with a colon (:) to show that a list follows. Each point in the list is a complete sentence, so it starts with a capital letter and ends with a full stop.

Type 2

The fees include:

  • course material
  • preparation time
  • travelling expenses.

The initial phrase is a complete sentence but ends with a colon (:) to show that a list follows. Each point in the list is short (a phrase) and so the points do not start with a capital letter and only the last point has a full stop.

Type 3

The courses are designed for trainees who:

  • have a degree in accountancy;
  • need work experience; and
  • live in the London area.

The initial phrase is a complete sentence but ends with a colon (:) to show that a list follows. Each point in the list is part of a continuous sentence. The points do not start with capital letters and there is a semi-colon (;) separating each point. Before the last point there is 'and' to show that it is part of a continuous sentence.

With this type of list, be careful that the points coming after the introduction are grammatically consistent. Take a look at the following example of a grammatically inconsistent list.

Incorrect Version:

The people:

  • who live in London;
  • who are over 25; and
  • have a degree;

are eligible.

This list is incorrect because you need another 'who' in the third point to make a grammatically consistent sentence.

Correct Version:

The people who:

  • live in London;
  • are over 25; and
  • have a degree;

are eligible.

This list is correct because "who live", "who are" and "who have" are all plural endings to match 'people'. The list is grammatically consistent.

 
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