So, you want to improve your English? At your age and level of language learning, there are some things you can't change. For example, you can't change:

  • the language learning ability that you were born with;
  • your ability to tell the difference between different sounds and your ability to make sounds;
  • your ability to remember words and phrases.

However, there are many things you CAN do, and the first and most important thing is to try to change your attitudes about using and speaking English. For example, you can try:

  • not to be embarrassed about making mistakes;
  • to be more outgoing and make more effort to socialise with other people;;
  • to ask questions when you do not understand something;
  • to greet your English speaking colleagues rather than crossing the room or corridor to avoid them;
  • to get into the habit of asking other bilingual speakers the question, "How do you say __________ in English?" or 'What does ___________ mean?";
  • to make opportunities to practice your English (and not just wait for them to come along or expect others to make them for you);
  • to commend yourself for every extra effort you make to use your English;
  • to have fun with your English instead of just studying and worrying about it;
  • to stop saying either to yourself or others, "Oh dear, my English is poor. It will never improve!" It will improve, but only if you use it!

In your efforts to improve your English, it may be helpful for you to understand what the differences are between the Not-So-Good Language Learner and the Good Language Learner.

The Not-So-Good Language Learner:

  1. Doesn't try to say anything he or she doesn't know how to say;
  2. Avoids making mistakes so as not to appear foolish;
  3. Pays little attention to language form, and fails to note language patterns;
  4. Pays little attention to his or her own speech or the speech of others;
  5. Relies too much on grammar;
  6. Doesn't try to guess at meanings;
  7. Doesn't practice.

The Good Language Learner:

  1. Tries hard to communicate, to get his or her message across;
  2. Is willing to make mistakes, even to appear foolish;
  3. Pays attention to language form and looks for patterns in the language;
  4. Monitors his or her own speech and the speech of others, checking for mistakes and deviations from intended meaning;
  5. Pays attention to meaning, knowing that grammar and the surface forms of speech are not in themselves enough to understand the message;
  6. Is willing to make guesses;
  7. Practices.
 
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