In this week's business English tip, we'll show you three different ways in which you can ask someone about the company they work for.

You can question someone about their company in a number of ways. Let’s look at three different questions types.

Closed Questions

Closed questions in the present simple tense usually begin with phrases like ‘do you,’ ‘have you,’ or ‘are you.’ These questions elicit ‘yes’/’no’ answers, and refer to the company’s present situation. Let’s look at a few examples of closed questions in the present simple tense:

Do you have any regional offices in Asia?
Have you got an office in Germany?
Do you have any plans to establish operations in China?
Do you target the telecommunications industry as well?
Does your company cater to the international market too?
Do you have any clients in France?
Are you planning to set up an office here?

NOTE: Closed questions are useful when you want specific information. If you are answering a closed question, however, answering with ‘yes’ or ‘no’ is generally insufficient. You will also be expected to provide additional information.

Open Ended Questions

Open ended questions usually begin with the five ‘wh’ question words (who, what, when, where, why) or ‘how’. They give the other person the chance to expand their answer. Let’s look at some examples of open questions:

Who founded your company?
When did the company launch its overseas operations?
What does the personnel management department do?
Where did you set up your first office?
Why did the company decide to shut down its Boston office?
How long did it take for your company to establish itself in the market?
What are your company’s plans for the future?
How are you planning to fund these new operations?

Indirect Questions / Question Statements

In the early stages of a conversation, or when asking something sensitive, it is a good idea to use indirect questions or question statements. Such questions generally start with phrases such as ‘I was wondering,’ ‘Could you tell me,’ and ‘I’d like to know.’ Here are some examples:

Could you tell me about your experiences with former clients? (Indirect Question)
I’d like to know how long it would take you to respond to a complaint from a customer. (Question Statement)
I was wondering if the product has had good sales in the international market. (Question Statement)
Could you tell me if your company is an equal opportunities employer? (Indirect Question)
Could you tell me what your policy is on refunds for customers? (Indirect Question)

Remember to choose your question type carefully to get the right information that you are looking for. Closed questions tell the other person that you’re looking for a quick answer, while open questions ask for detailed answers. Indirect questions are polite questions and should be used when it is appropriate to be more polite.

 
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