Business English Tip of the Week

business-english-tipsEvery week we publish a business English tip concerning different aspects of business English. Topic areas include writing, speaking, listening, grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation, exams as well as general English. To receive 'Business English Tip of the Week' by email, just subscribe to our newsletter. You can choose whether to receive the newsletter weekly or monthly. Simply click on the link on the right to subscribe. It's free!

Communication Problems in English

03 Feb 2013

In this week's tip, we'll provide you with some advice on what to say if you can't understand or hear someone clearly.

If you don't understand what someone says:

If you are speaking to someone and you don't understand the meaning of what they say, you could say:

I’m not sure what you mean. Could you rephrase that, please?

If you ask someone to rephrase something, you are asking them to express the same meaning using different words. This is a useful phrase since you might not have understood because of the language they've used.

You could also use these phrases to clarify the meaning of what’s been said:

Could you explain what you mean?
What do you mean?
I’m sorry I don’t understand.
Could you explain what you mean by….?
Could you clarify what you mean when you say….?

If you can't hear what someone says:

If you can't hear what someone has said, try these phrases:

Sorry, I didn’t hear the last part of what you said.
Sorry, I didn’t catch the last part of what you said.
Could you say that again please?
Could you please repeat that?
Would you mind repeating that?
Would you mind talking a little slower, because my English is not fluent yet?
Sorry, could you speak up a little, please?
Would you mind speaking a little louder, please?

If someone can't hear what you've said:

Sometimes people may not understand what you are saying if you make a grammar mistake or use vocabulary in the wrong way. In these situations, you can say:

Let me rephrase that.
Let me try and say that again in a different way.
I’m trying to say that….
I wanted to say that….
Let me try to explain.

 

Test

05 Dec 2011
test  

Speaking Tips

07 Nov 2010

In this week's tip, we'll give you a couple of useful speaking advice.

Keeping a Conversation Going

What can you say when you want to encourage people to keep talking to you?

Try making a comment or asking a question it shows the other person you're interested in what they're saying.

Here are some examples of what you can say:

  • Making Comments

    'No' to show surprise

    'I don't believe it' to show surprise

    'Wow' to show admiration and surprise

    'That's incredible / That's amazing / That's unbelievable' to show great interest in the subject of conversation.

  • Asking Questions

    'Really?' - to show surprise

    'And you?' when someone asks you how you are.

    'Did you?' can be used to encourage someone to tell their story. For example, 'I saw her with him last night', 'Did you', 'They looked like they were getting on really well with each other and '.'

Agreeing with People

In English conversations, people often say that they agree or disagree with each other. There are many ways of agreeing and disagreeing and the one you use depends on how strongly you agree or disagree. Here's a list of common expressions:

'I think you're right.'

'I agree with you.'

'I feel the same way as you about it.'

If you want to agree more strongly, you can use these expressions:

'I couldn't agree with you more.'

'You're absolutely right.'

 
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