Business English Tip of the Week

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Confusing Words - "Allow" vs "Permit" vs "Let" vs "Enable"

14 Apr 2019

These four verbs are all similar, but have different shades of meaning and use.

Allow and permit can be followed by an object, and optionally, a verb or another object:

Until recently, the club would not allow women to enter.
Until recently, the club would not permit women to enter.

Let needs a different construction; the object is followed by an infinitive without to:

Until recently, the club would not let women enter.
Please let me know urgently.

Note the use of allow to politely introduce something you want to say:

Allow me to point out that ...
Allow me to introduce myself. My name is ...

If you allow for problems, extra expenses etc. you include extra time or money to be able to deal with them:

If you are self-employed, do not forget to allow for tax and national insurance.

To enable means 'to make something possible'; Allow also has this meaning as in:

During the 19th Century road and rail transport allowed/enabled commerce to expand.

Enable is often preferable if there is no idea of 'permission':

A rights issue enabled the company to raise extra capital.
A word processor enables a secretary to type faster than on a typewriter.

Note that these verbs must be followed by a personal object before an infinitive. We cannot say:

Our round-the-clock service enables/permits/allows to satisfy demand.

The correct version is:

Our round-the-clock service enables/permits/allows us to satisfy demand.
 

Handling Difficult Requests

07 Apr 2019

In the key expressions box below, you'll find a number of standard phrases that you might find useful for handling difficult requests at work. Click on the audio link to listen to the expressions.

 

 

 

FUNCTIONS

KEY EXPRESSIONS

SAYING WHY YOU'RE CALLING

The reason I'm calling is:
I was calling to ask a favour:..
I'm calling to ask if you could:..
I'm calling because we need some help......
 

EXPLAINING THE PROBLEM

The situation is this....
Here's the problem.....
Let me explain the situation......
 

REFUSING A REQUEST

I'm afraid that's not possible.
I'm sorry but we just can't do that.
I wish we could help you, but:..
I'm sorry, but I'm not in a position to do that.
 

STATING YOUR POSITION

I understand your situation, but we really must request:..
Our company policy is to:..
It's not our company policy to.....
We always demand .....
We never allow.....
 

MAKING A POLITE REQUEST

Would it be possible to.:?
We were wondering if you could possibly.:?
Would you be able to:.?
Could you please.....?
We'd appreciate it if you could.....
We'd be grateful if you could.....
 

SUGGESTING A COMPROMISE

How about if we......?
What (about if we...?
If we were to ....... would you....?
We'd also be willing to.....
How would you feel if we...?
Why don't we/you:...?
 

AGREEING TO A REQUEST

We could probably accept that.
We might be able to agree to that.
We could agree to that on condition that......
I suppose we could accept that.
That is a possibility, but I'd have to check with....
 
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