Business English Tip of the Week

business-english-tipsEvery week we publish a business English tip concerning different aspects of business English. Topic areas include writing, speaking, listening, grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation, exams as well as general English. To receive 'Business English Tip of the Week' by email, just subscribe to our newsletter. You can choose whether to receive the newsletter weekly or monthly. Simply click on the link on the right to subscribe. It's free!

Controlling a Telephone Call with a Native Speaker

19 May 2019

One of the biggest problems is speed. Native speakers, especially business people, tend to speak very quickly on the telephone. As a non-native speaker, you need to develop techniques which will allow you to take control of the call. Here are some practical tips:

 
  • Immediately ask the person to speak slowly

Could you speak more slowly, please?
Would you mind speaking more slowly, please?
Would you slow down a little, please?

  • When taking note of a name or important information, repeat each piece of information as the person speaks.

So, you say you can give us a discount of 10%?
OK, you are willing to extend the warranty to 30 days, right?
Your telephone number is 2718 3892 and your email address is.....
Let me just confirm that. Your name is Andy Hogg and your company is called ‘Gtech Ltd’.
Let me just repeat what you have said.
I’d just like to confirm what you’ve just told me.

This is an especially effective tool. By repeating each important piece of information, or each number or letter, you automatically slow the speaker down.
  • Do not say you have understood if you have not. Ask the person to repeat until you have understood.

I’m sorry, I don’t understand what you’re saying.
I’m afraid I don’t know what you mean.
I sorry, but I don’t follow you.
Would you mind going over that again for me?
Could you say that again, please?
Could you repeat that, please?
Could you explain what you mean?

Remember that the other person needs to make himself/herself understood and it is in his/her interest to make sure that you have understood. If you ask a person to explain more than twice they will usually slow down.
  • If the person does not slow down begin speaking your own language!
A sentence or two of another language spoken quickly will remind the person that they are fortunate because THEY do not need to speak a different language to communicate. Used carefully, this exercise in humbling the other speaker can be very effective. Just be sure to use it with colleagues and not with a boss!
 

Showing Empathy in Business Situations

12 May 2019

In the key expressions box below, you'll find a number of standard phrases that you might find useful for showing empathy in business situations. Click on the audio link to listen to the expressions.

 

FUNCTIONS

KEY EXPRESSIONS

Reflecting - Reflecting on how you can see what someone is feeling:

I can see that you're really upset about this.
You seem to be upset.
You seem upset.
You don't seem to be very happy at the moment.
You seem to have made your decision already.
 

Legitimizing - Putting yourself in the other person's situation:

I'd be upset, too.
I can understand why you would be upset about that.
I can definitely see why that would be frustrating.
I'm sure that irritated you!
I can understand your concerns, but.
I understand that.
I can see how hearing those comments might annoy you.
It's not very nice to hear comments like that, is it?
I can understand your feeling betrayed by my not talking to you directly.
I can definitely see why that would upset you.
 

Supporting - Offering to help in a specific way:

I'll be here if you have any questions.
If you are unhappy here, I am here to discuss it with you.
 

Partnership-building - Offering to work together as a team to solve a problem

Maybe we can focus on,,,,
Let's see what we can do to resolve this problem together.
 

Respecting - Expressing admiration for how another person is coping with a situation

You don't seem to be too upset about this.

You are dealing with this very well.

 

Using Precise Active Verbs

05 May 2019

Strengthen word choice at the word and sentence level by adding precise verbs. Avoid non-specific verbs and the overuse of is, are, was, were, I or we. Always look for verbs that are masked as nouns. Convert the noun back to a verb by using its root and rewrite the sentence.

Example

John Smith will contact you at 11.30 p.m.

Revised

John smith will send you an e-mail at 11.30 p.m.

Revised

John Smith will visit you at 11.30 p.m.

 

Example

We must consider this problem.

Revised

We must resolve this problem.

 

Example

The report is a summary of previous research on drinking.

Revised

The report summarises research on drinking.

 

Example

The copy editor made an improvement to the draft.

Revised

The copy editor improved the draft.

 

Example

John is responsible for the distribution of the daily marketing report.

Revised

John distributes the daily marketing report.

 

Example

Improvement of the invoicing system will be performed by Jane Smith.

Revised

Jane Smith will improve the invoicing system.

 

Example

Candidate interviewing and employment is done by Human Resources.

Revised

Human Resources interviews and employs all candidates.

 

Example

All credit card approval is done by Jane Smith.

Revised

Jane Smith approves credit cards.

 
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